Tinariwen

with Lonnie Holley

Tinariwen 2019 MB.jpg

Sat Oct 12

Tinariwen

with Lonnie Holley

Doors: 8:00 pm
Start: 9:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$35

The Grammy award-winning Saharan-folk rock band created a one-of-a-kind fusion with their North African-percussion, blues rock guitar riffs, & bass grooves!

Buy Tickets

Event Information

Not on the e-mail list for Presales? Sign Up to be a Belly Up VIP and you will never miss a chance to grab tickets before they go on sale to the general public again!


Genre: world / folk / blues


Ticket Price: $35 advanced & day of show / $62 reserved loft seating (loft seating is available over the phone or in person at our box office)


CASBAH PRESENTS

Tinariwen

Tinariwen’s own story burgeons with myth and mythos in their home country and beyond. Their tale is the stuff of legends. Founding member ibrahim ag alhabib, grew up in desolation in mali, where he witnessed his own father’s death at the age of four. Later, after seeing a western film, he built his first guitar from a bicycle wire, a stick and a tin can. The band was founded in the 1980’s in tureg camps in libya, where the nomadic peoples had relocated to find work and a new life away from their homeland of the sahara. Disillusioned by the promises of quaddafi at the time, the tuareg became restless again and longed for home. But the interaction with city life yielded unexpected consequences, the became exposed to western music — most notably the guitar-driven anthems of jimi hendrix and the american blues — which they mixed with their own soulful dirges which they’d perform in the camps by the fire with battery-operated amps. When revolution broke out back in mali, they left libya behind, hung up their guitars and picked up guns to fight for the tuareg independence. When the dischord died down, the band returned to music, delivering songs imbued with aching beauty and lonesome poetry. Their music was bootlegged and traded around the region, earning them a devout following. Then in the late 1990s, they were discovered by western musicians and for the first time, their songs left the sahara and were introduced to the world. For the next ten years, the nomads now traveled the world, performing at nearly every notable festivals and venues around the globe, providing the world with a taste of the aching beauty and lonesome pleasures of saharan assouf.

Lonnie Holley

Lonnie Holley was born on February 10, 1950 in Birmingham, Alabama. From the age of five, Holley worked various jobs: picking up trash at a drive-in movie theatre, washing dishes, and cooking. He lived in a whiskey house, on the state fairgrounds, and in several foster homes. His early life was chaotic and Holley was never afforded the pleasure of a real childhood.

Since 1979, Holley has devoted his life to the practice of improvisational creativity. His art and music, born out of struggle, hardship, but perhaps more importantly, out of furious curiosity and biological necessity, has manifested itself in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, performance, and sound. Holley’s sculptures are constructed from found materials in the oldest tradition of African American sculpture. Objects, already imbued with cultural and artistic metaphor, are combined into narrative sculptures that commemorate places, people, and events. His work is now in collections of major museums throughout the country, on permanent display in the United Nations, and been displayed in the White House Rose Garden. In January of 2014, Holley completed a one-month artist-in-residence with the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in Captiva Island, Florida, site of the acclaimed artist’s studio.