The Dead Milkmen

with The Bombpops

Thu May 31

The Dead Milkmen

with The Bombpops

Doors: 7:00 pm
Start: 8:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$23-$25

The Dead Milkmen distinguished themselves in the hardcore punk scene of the early 1980s through their jangly punk sound and sardonic humor delivered with thick Philadelphia accents. They attracted college radio attention with their hit song Bitchin Camaro.

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Genre: Punk


Ticket Price: $23 advanced / $25 day of show / $41 reserved loft seating

The Dead Milkmen

Although there are numerous, conflicting, tales of how, when, where, and sometimes why the Dead Milkmen initially formed, the most reliable evidence points to band founder Joe Jack Talcum's decision, in the late 1970's, to create a band based entirely upon a group of woodcuts he discovered in the basement of The Vatican. Talcum then recruited acquaintance Rodney Anonymous and the pair immediately set about unlearning everything they had previously learned about music and spending countless hours screaming at inanimate objects.

In 1982 bassist Dave Blood was added to the group after impressing Talcum and Anonymous with his ability to cover passing vehicles with ketchup. Shortly afterward, and entirely against his own will and better judgment, drummer Dean Clean joined the band.

In 1985, the band, or "The Dead Milkmen" as they were now known, released their debut album "Big Lizard in My Backyard" which was instantly declared "The greatest cultural achievement of our time" (by the band themselves). Big Lizard was followed by "Eat Your Paisley" in 1986 and "Bucky Fellini" in 1987.

The hit single "Punk Rock Girl" from the Dead Milkmen's 1988 release "Beelzebubba" opened many doors to mainstream success, which the band then purposely set about slamming shut in the faces of anyone who used the term "Market Penetration" in a non-sexual sense. Two years later, the Milkmen followed up "Beelzebubba" with "Metaphysical Graffiti"; a work which is universally regarded as "a CD you can buy if you've got roughly eleven dollars".

Bored and looking to "do something different that didn't include sacrificing a goat", the band then began recording "Soul Rotation" (1992). Although critically acclaimed as a brilliant recording (again, by the band themselves), sales were disappointing and the band returned to shoplifting.

1993's "Not Richard, But Dick" saw the band return to form and to arguing with each other...loudly ...mostly in public places ...like restaurants, and so the band agreed that 1995's "Stoney's Extra Stout (Pig)" would be their final recording unless "some idiot hands us a %$#@load of money to record another CD." Tragically, for the Milkmen's bank accounts, the idiot with the money was killed by a polar bear at the Kiev Municipal Zoo.

In March of 2004, bassist Dave Blood decided to fake his own death for artistic reasons. Today he lives in a remote Serbian village with his wives and innumerable offspring. Suffering from the loss of Blood, it appeared that the Milkmen would never reunite, let alone reform, or even band together again.

In 2008 the band reunited, with bassist Dan Stevens on bass, playing the bass, in order to play Austin TX's Fun Fun Fun Fest (temporarily renamed from "Fun Fun Fun Fun Fest" because "It'll be a little less fun with the Dead Milkmen there.")

2011's release of "The King in Yellow" - the Milkmen's first release in sixteen years - was at once declared a seamless continuation of their earlier work...in that it's a CD you can buy if you've got roughly eleven dollars.

In the autumn of 2012 the Dead Milkmen began releasing a series of singles on the should-be-by-now-obsolete 7 inch vinyl format in an obvious attempt to appeal to a younger "hipster" audience. Despite mounting evidence that the singles are failing to expand their fan base, the obstinate Milkmen have continued to produce them, with eight "sides" already released.

Jump to the autumn of 2014 and we now find the Milkmen have assembled the singles songs plus six additional new recordings into a complete album package entitled "Pretty Music For Pretty People". It's a CD you can buy if you've got roughly eleven dollars.

Additionally, in a desperate ploy to appeal to the still stubborn vinyl fetishist, the they have put a "special" collection of the six new tunes and three of the "C-Sides" previously only released digitally into a limited edition vinyl version of the album entitled "Pretty Music For Pretty SPECIAL People". Clever huh? "Special"...get it? The band continues to sell their music via an online order form on their web site at deadmilkmen.com .

The Bombpops

“We put a lot of thought into being able to tell stories with these songs,” says Jen Razavi who, along with Poli van Dam, founded The Bombpops in 2007. Together, Razavi and van Dam became the band’s backbone, writing songs that highlighted their dual guitar attack and were carried by their pitch-perfect vocal harmonies. It’d take the band a decade to release their first full-length album, but 2017’s Fear of Missing Out was a perfect distillation of everything they’d been working toward. And now, with the Dear Beer EP, they’re proving that there’s plenty more where that came from.

The four new tracks that make up Dear Beer are as distinct as they are powerful. “The song ‘Dear Beer’ was collectively everyone in the band’s favorite song,” says Razavi, and it’s easy to see why. Where Fear of Missing Out saw Razavi and van Dam throwing out pointed lyrical jabs, Dear Beer ups the introspection. Make no mistake, there’s still a bit of bile getting spit up, but there’s just the right amount of levity mixed in. It’s what allows these songs to work as stories, ones that are resonant for the band members, and will surely hit home for anyone who plays Dear Beer all the way through.

“I love a song where the lyrics tell a story, and although I may have never experienced anything like what is happening in that story, the song allows me to put myself in that person’s place,” says Razavi. The Dear Beer EP finds unity in the thematic elements of each song, as each one sees The Bombpops offering up personal anecdotes and crafting songs that have, as Razavi and van Dam intended, a narrative arc. It’s seen in “Dear Beer,” where they swear off drinking alone and vow to stop being “a fucking downer,” a mantra that enables them to cut out the source of the toxicity without a second thought. But even when it gets a little heavy, The Bombpops find ways to make it all feel uplifting.

“‘Dear Beer’ and ‘Turn up the Thermostat’ are particularly dark,” says Razavi, “They’re a bit self-loathing and reflect on negative experiences.” While the lyrics on Dear Beer are culled from difficult experiences, The Bombpops use their buoyant music to push back against the things weighing them down. And of course, it doesn’t hurt that they throw in just the right amount of self-deprecation to keep themselves from ever making it too much of a bummer. “We intentionally put those lyrics to playful, poppy melodies. It weirdly has a therapeutic effect in the long run,” says Razavi. “Making them light and playful makes the thing that seemed so dramatic to us at the time something to laugh about now.”

That balance between the series and the lighthearted is what makes Dear Beer not just the logical evolution of The Bombpops sound, but also the start of a new chapter for the band. It may have taken them a decade to release their first album, but as Dear Beer proves, the wind is at their back, and nothing is going to keep them down.

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143 S. CEDROS AVE
SOLANA BEACH, CA 92075
858.481.8140

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143 S. Cedros Ave
Solana Beach, CA 92075 (map)
(858) 481-8140
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