Kimmi Bitter, Nena Anderson & Alice Wallace

Kimmi Bitter, Nena Anderson & Alice Wallace

Thu Feb 21

Kimmi Bitter, Nena Anderson & Alice Wallace

Doors: 7:00 pm
Start: 8:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$10-$12

Join us for a night of Americana bands featuring three of SoCal’s best, rising singer-songwriters!

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Event Information

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Genre: singer-songwriter


Ticket Price: $10 advanced / $12 day of show / $18 reserved loft seating (loft seating is available over the phone or in person at our box office)

Kimmi Bitter

With a strong affinity for the roots of American music, Kimmi Bitter is a throwback mixed between the 1970's delicate singer-songwriter and 1960's vintage country. Styling her songs around the classic sounds of Patsy Cline with The Jordanaire's, Loretta Lynn, and Linda Ronstadt, her debut album "West Side Twang" features a California take on traditional country and soul. A strong believer in minimalism and retro-technology, all her songs were recorded live band to analog tape at Lost Ark Studio in hometown San Diego, CA.

Nena Anderson

If Chrissie Hynde and Emmylou Harris met in a dark honky-tonk...Nena Anderson’s blues-tinged Americana is birthed from heartaches and hope, and the life experiences that we all have in common. Her songs and voice console with an “I’ve been there too,” feeling, while reminding us that we will all get through it. A charismatic live performer, Nena’s velvet voice is soulful and intimate, always leaving you wanting more, with melodies that you can’t get out of your head. Many bands, music genres, touring and collaborations since she began, Nena has landed right where she is supposed to be, with new songs that nod to her many influences while being completely her own. San Diego’s best kept secret, Nena has earned 20 San Diego Music Award nominations (and a win), in the categories of Americana, Acoustic, Jazz, Tribute Band and New Artist. She fronts her solo band (Nena Anderson) as well as acclaimed country band, Brawley, and performs as featured vocalist of the Americana/jazz combo, Jetset. She is also a member of the collaborative album/concert project, For The Sender, and spent several years touring with Johnny Cash Tribute, Cash’d Out, as June Carter Cash. She has shared stages with such diverse artists as Lucinda Williams, Gregg Allman, Dan Hicks, Jack Tempchin and Cindy Lee Berryhill.

Alice Wallace

“It’s a song about taking the risk to do what you love,” Alice Wallace says of the soaring track, “The Blue,” which yields a lyric entitling her spellbinding new album. With Into the Blue, the California-country singer-songwriter conjures the atmospheric sound of the Golden State’s canyons and deserts, mountains and crashing waves, its crowning beauty and its tragic losses. At the same time, the supple-voiced Wallace tells her own and others’ stories, weaving tales that resonate as we grapple with so many disturbing national issues.



Into the Blue is Wallace’s fourth album but marks her debut on the brand-new Rebelle Road label, an imprint founded by a trio of women dedicated to strengthening the California Country music community and expanding visibility for female artists in the Americana/roots genre. “They care so deeply about giving women a stronger voice in the music industry,” Wallace attests. Having spent the past six years writing songs and touring the nation – from AMERICANAFEST® to county fairs, barrooms to coffeehouses – Alice Wallace is ready to break out. “It takes bravery to ‘sail away into the blue’ and grab it,” she says. “It took me until about six years ago to finally take the plunge, quit my job and go for it. I haven’t looked back since.”



It was after Wallace’s return to her birth state of California that she fully embraced her calling as a singer-songwriter. Her musical family had relocated to rural St. Cloud, Florida, when she was a child. She grew up around the sounds of her parents playing guitars and singing, with “Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris, their favorite,” she recalls. She also absorbed the country rock of ‘70s-era Linda Ronstadt on the turntable. “I really taught myself to sing by mimicking their styles,” she says. “The powerful belt that Linda has. The emotive lilt to Emmylou’s voice. Trying to navigate those different elements helped me find my own voice nestled in between all that.” She first picked up guitar at age 10, with her dad teaching her to finger-pick at 15, and by senior year in high school, Wallace was performing original compositions at the local Borders bookstore. It was in college that she discovered yet another calling: yodeling, that haunting vocal style that blends blues, country, and western. Wallace’s own “A Little Yodel” added her to the ranks of legends Patsy Montana and Carolina Cotton.



In 2008, when the Wallace family relocated back to Southern California, she joined them. There, she began focusing on writing, performing, and touring, both solo and with a band. Since 2013, she performs some 200 dates a year. One of those with whom she’s shared stages is singer-songwriter Ray Wylie Hubbard, who says she and her “stunning” songcraft have that “Steve McQueen ‘Cincinnati Kid’ cool.” Pundits agree: she won the 2017 Female Vocalist of the Year at the California Country Awards and the previous year’s Best Country/Americana Artist at the L.A. Music Critic Awards. She was recently singled out by the Los Angeles Daily News and Pollstar for her “dead-on lovely version” of Ronstadt’s “throbbing” “Long Long Time” at the “Palomino Rides Again” event celebrating the legendary California honky-tonk.



Into the Blue represents Wallace’s evolution as a recording artist, showcasing her growth as a songwriter as she embraces a fuller sound, backed by some of Americana’s most distinctive players. Co-produced by Steve Berns and Rebelle Road’s studio veteran, songwriter and musician KP Hawthorn (who’ve made a name for themselves working with artists in the West coast Americana scene), the album is brimming with soul. The formidable rhythm section, including drummer Jay Bellerose (Bonnie Raitt, Elton John, Aimee Mann) and bassist Jennifer Condos (Jackson Browne, Graham Nash), underpins instrumentation ranging from Tom Bremer’s crunchy electric guitar to Kaitlin Wolfberg’s lush string arrangements to keys and pedal steel from Jeremy Long (Sam Outlaw).



Wallace uses an intoxicating array of vocal styles to bring her songs to life: a dusky alto on “The Lonely Talking” (co-written with KP Hawthorn); gospel-tinged belting on “When She Cries” (inspired by the end of a six-year drought in California), and a soaring soprano on “Santa Ana Winds.” The latter, a country-rock chronicle of California’s devastating wildfires, is a co-write with Dallas artist Andrew Delaney, a frequent collaborator whom she calls “the most brilliant lyricist I’ve ever met.” Wallace inhabits his stirring “Elephants,” giving voice to women who refuse to be “quiet as a mouse in a room full of elephants.” The Wallace-Delaney-penned “Echo Canyon” is, she says, “a southwestern cowboy ballad that’s a modern take on a yodel song.” Wallace’s heart-wrenching “Desert Rose” tells of a young mother’s struggle to give her baby a better life across the border.



Lyrically, the heart of the album is the luminous anthem, “The Blue,” says Wallace. It describes her own journey to “get over my fears and go for the thing I love the most.” She knew that being a traveling troubadour and committing herself fully to music could be a dangerous choice. “In some ways, I wish I had done it sooner,” she says. “But I’m also glad I have the life experience to help fuel my songwriting and survive life on the road.” The highly charged emotional feel of “The Blue” derives in part from its exquisite layered harmonies – Wallace’s vocals joined by those of her father, mother, and brother. Known as “blood harmony,” when kinfolk sing together, it conveys a rapturous kind of purity and strength. That buoyancy radiates throughout Alice Wallace’s Into the Blue, lifting her listeners up, transporting them into the world of a seasoned troubadour looking back from a dream realized and dues paid without regret.