Anderson East

with Malachi Henry and The Lights

Anderson East 2019 MB.jpeg

Sat Sep 28

Anderson East

with Malachi Henry and The Lights

Doors: 8:00 pm
Start: 9:00 pm
Age: Ages 21+ Only
Price:$25

Offering up a heaping helping of alternative rock with a healthy dose of timeless Americana influence, Anderson East is a dynamic artist who fuses modern sound with the rich undertones of his southern roots.

Sold Out

Event Information

Not on the e-mail list for Presales? Sign Up to be a Belly Up VIP and you will never miss a chance to grab tickets before they go on sale to the general public again!


Genre: southern soul / americana


Ticket Price: $25 advanced & day of show / $44 reserved loft seating (loft seating is available over the phone or in person at our box office)

Anderson East

There are musicians who call themselves road warriors, and then there's Anderson East. An unflinching, inimitable talent armed with a potent and husky voice, the gritty-blues and-soul-toasting singer has spent the past two years pounding the pavement in the wake of his breakout debut album, 2015's Delilah. It was only fitting then that whatever came next for East would bleed with an intimate and urgent sense of immediacy. "We wanted to present every song as a true performance," the musician says of the stunning and diverse 11 tracks that comprise Encore, the Alabama native's forthcoming new album due January 12 via Low Country Sound/Elektra Records.

The album's title is derived from East's steadfast belief: that every song on his new album must be worthy of closing out one of his notoriously epic live shows. "It was very much about trying to feel live and loose," East says of the writing and recording of Encore as well as its genre-blurring material that blends the boundary-pushing singer's equal-parts love of country-blues ("King For A Day"), soul ("Surrender"), pop ("All On My Mind") and beatific balladry ("Cabinet Door"). Derived from recording sessions over the past year at Nashville's historic RCA Studio A with his longtime producer, Dave Cobb, East's latest LP gives credence to his billing as one of contemporary music's most compelling young artists. Says the singer-songwriter of the sense of accomplishment that surrounds Encore: "You just know when it's right."

For East, stitching together his new album was as much about searching for outside inspiration as drawing from his own well of experience. "I think it's just the nature of wanting to tell stories," the thoughtful, well-articulated singer says of his decision to collaborate with a bevvy of world-renowned artists and songwriters on the album including Chris and Morgane Stapleton ("King For A Day"), Ed Sheeran ("All On My Mind"), Avicii ("Girlfriend") and Natalie Hemby ("This Too Shall Last," complete with an electric guitar assist from Ryan Adams). "You want to hang out with people who have great stories," he adds, noting "Especially people that have amazing craft."

Having spent much of this past year on the road together for the "All-American Road Show," working with the Stapleton's was a virtual inevitability for East. East recalls Chris and Morgane summoning him to their dressing room one evening post-show and the three proceeding to knock out "King For A Day" in short order. "I came there and he had the first couple lines already written," East says of the strutting and wistful tune. "It was midnight, we sat down and maybe 20 minutes later that song was done." He adds with a laugh: "Everybody even managed to leave on time." That particular song, East notes, also confirmed to him he was on the right path for his new project. "OK, we've got something really good here," he recalls thinking at the time. "I can breathe a little deeper now that this thing had been pulled from thin air."

Once back at the studio, having a trusted collaborator like Cobb was essential for East. The singer estimates he wrote 50 songs for Encore, nearly all of which started out as small snippets on his phone's voice recorder app. As a musician who never demo's songs, having a trusted ear like Cobb's helped East to quickly assess whether or not he should cut a particular tune. East describes Cobb as "incredibly vital" and the closest thing he's had to an in-studio bandmate. "We just have this level of trust and comfort with each other," he says of the Grammy-winning producer. "We ultimately want the best for each other and we want the best for the song. We're able to butt heads and get pissy at one another and then finally have worked really hard to get to a place that feels really natural."

If there was any pressure to live up to Delilah's success, East says it was entirely self-imposed. "There was just a lot of internal pressure of trying to make myself happy and impress myself rather than trying to impress other people," he explains. "I knew the development of myself as a performer and our strengths being a live band. I just wanted to make something really musical and something that had substance and that we could stand behind and have room to explore in front of an audience."

East will have plenty of opportunity to do exactly that: next year he'll embark on his largest headline tour to date, "Encore World Tour 2018," that includes stops at NYC's Bowery Ballroom, Nashville's 3rd & Lindsley, L.A.'s El Rey Theatre and San Francisco's The Fillmore. "I'm way more comfortable in my own skin onstage," East says of his evolution as a must-see performer. "And I definitely feel like I'm a far stronger singer than I was compared to when we were making Delilah."

Still, East is nothing if not the decidedly humble type. So much so that despite finding success in recent years, he says he's never been more appreciative for where his journey has taken him. "I'd been making music for ages and nobody cared about any of that before," he says with a laugh. "It's just very humbling. That we've gotten here is pretty sweet."

Malachi Henry and the Lights

Malachi Henry and the Lights is the sound of well water flowing up from dry land. It’s the shout from the back pew of a Wednesday night church service. It’s the metallic hiss of thousands of cicadas pulsing from the trees...

San Diego-based, Malachi Henry and the Lights is an alternative rock band deeply rooted in the raw and haunting sounds of early gospel and Southern soul, tempered with synth and sampled electronics.

When lead singer and songwriter, Ben Hernandez, left his home in California for North Carolina he eventually walked away from professional music as well. He continued writing though, crafting new songs that reflected his life in the South. They spoke of longing for the company of old friends, his time as a traveling salesman, and wrestling with spirituality. As he drove the stretches of highway and long-forgotten main streets through places like Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee, the sounds of Malachi Henry and the Lights began to emerge.

“I had come to a turnrow of sorts,” says Ben. “I looked back at the music I had done in the past and realized that so much new and different music lay ahead me. So, after some heavy contemplation I turned back to the ‘field’ and went to work.”

He returned to California to assemble a band that would draw his songs off the page and give them a life of their own and the timing was finally perfect. Hernandez recalls, “Each musician I reached out to, because of current or past band situations, all told me pretty much the same thing; that they were ready for something different, ready for music a little outside their comfort zones. I was ready for a change as well. Moving back to San Diego after living in North Carolina for so long, with new songs and new perspective on my music, was definitely humbling. I use this analogy a lot: that you need to prune a tree once-in-awhile to promote its growth and bear good fruit.”

Ben has recently returned from a two-month tour singing backup for the legendary Mavis Staples where he performed at shows and festivals around the country; including Chicago's Pitchfork festival, Outside Lands in San Francisco, Railbird Festival in Lexington, KY and a special show w/ the Newport Folk Festival.